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Netheril : Age of Magic

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Author Topic: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic  (Read 14299 times)

Professor Misclick

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Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« on: January 24, 2018, 05:49:54 am »
Disclaimers:
* There are only 10 human and 5 non-human deities in the setting at this time. In the future we may add more of the other deities but wanted to keep it manageable at the start.
* Only the "leader" of each of the non-human races is represented.
* Liberties were taken to balance the available Domains from NWN among the deities. Should the expanded list be available we'll review adding them at that time
* The information contained is not necessarily complete. Some is inaccurate deliberately as this is supposed to be mostly IC information. Some of it is a mistake. Some should not be common IC knowledge. Contact the DM-Team or me directly with any questions or observations.
* As with everything presented during a setting build/roll-out, expect some changes. If you've some ideas or thoughts that can add to this, or for that matter any of the future posts, please let us know!

Happy reading!

The Prof

P.S Special thanks to Mort for finding these images and getting them to work!
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 08:37:34 am by Professor Misclick »

Professor Misclick

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2018, 05:56:07 am »
Quote
Netheril Deity and Domains

Amaunator

•   Fire
•   Knowledge
•   Protection
•   Strength
•   Sun

Jannath

•   Animal
•   Earth
•   Good
•   Plant
•   Protection
•   Water


Jergal

•   Death
•   Destruction
•   Evil
•   Heal
•   Travel

Kozah

•   Air
•   Destruction
•   Evil
•   Fire
•   Water

Moander

•   Animal
•   Death
•   Destruction
•   Evil
•   Plant


Mystryl

•   Air
•   Knowledge
•   Magic
•   Trickery


Selune

•   Good
•   Protection
•   Travel
•   Healing

Shar

•   Evil
•   Knowledge
•   Trickery
•   Magic

Targus

•   Destruction
•   Strength
•   Travel
•   War


Tyche

•   Evil
•   Good
•   Protection
•   Travel
•   Trickery

Corellon Larethian

•   Good
•   Magic
•   Protection
•   War

Garl Glittergold

•   Earth
•   Good
•   Trickery
•   Protection

Gruumsh

•   Destruction
•   Evil
•   Strength
•   War

Moradin

•   Good
•   Earth
•   Protection
•   War

Yondalla

•   Good
•   Healing
•   Protection
•   Trickery


« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 06:35:49 am by Professor Misclick »

Professor Misclick

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2018, 05:57:56 am »

AMAUNATOR
The Yellow God, Keeper of the Eternal Sun, Keeper of Law, Keeper of the Yellow Sun, The Light of the Law
Symbol: Sun with a face on the solar disk
Home Plane: Mechanus/Keep of the Eternal Sun
Alignment: Lawful Neutral
Portfolio: Bureaucracy, contracts, law, order, the sun, rulership
Worshippers: Rulers, Soldiers, Mages, Politicians, Judges, Monks, Anyone seeking justice or fair application of the law.
Favored Weapon: Scepter of the Eternal Sun ((Mace))
Cleric Alignment: LN, LE, LG
NWN Domain: Fire, Knowledge, Strength, Sun, Protection
History Relationships: Amaunator (Ah-MAWN-ah-tor) was the god of law and the sun. He was revered as the patron of law and (much less vigorously) as the keeper of time. His justice was fair but harsh. He was honored by many rulers, soldiers, and powerful mages.

Dogma: Amaunatori were taught that the law was the law. The law kept order in society, and without it civilization would unravel and chaos would reign. Amaunator represented the sure function of the law, for just as certainly as the sun would rise in the morning, the law could deal fairly with any dispute and any crime.
Novice Amaunatori were charged as follows: “Learn the law and live it; obey its every letter and clause, for in knowledge of the intricacies of law lies freedom to act with righteous impuni- ty. Keep track of the decisions of your superiors so that the body of precedent continues to grow and the unity of purpose of the rulings of Amaunator is made manifest to all. Serve your superi- ors faithfully, and they will reward you faithfully; shirk your duty and find the harsh hand of reproof.”

Day-to-Day Activities: All clergy members had to learn‚ understand, and know how to reap the benefits from (exploit) the laws of the land, the city, and the province they lived in. In order to completely understand the nuances of law and legisla- ture, the clergy constantly drilled each other, practiced law in court whenever possible, and rehearsed law in practice court- rooms, They couldn’t resist investigating the scene of a crime or taking part in the construction of new laws in their locale, and did so with great intensity and fervor.
Amaunatori served often in court as judges, to present cases, and to hear legal arguments and disputes. They were paid well to settle merchant disputes over contracts, agreements, and trade practices and made a comfortable living for themselves and their church as arbitrators of all sorts of commercial and personal claims not worthy  of the attention  of figures  of power in  ultimate authority.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: The holiest of days in the church of Amaunator was the celebration of the anniversary of the signing of the Pantheon Contour, an agreement between the powers adjudicated by Amaunator. This anniversary was celebrated on the third full moon of the year. The festivities were marked by Amaunator’s followers donning magisterial regalia and parading the holy symbol of Amaunator before every court and through the streets.
The longest day of the year, the summer solstice, was another important holiday. The followers of Amaunator spent the day relaxing, sunbathing, and praying to their god, thanking him for the gift of sunlight he sheds on the world. Amaunatori believed that if this day was not properly celebrated, Amaunator could withhold sunlight from the face of Toril for a year.
Every time a devout follower of Amaunator was able to take advantage of someone in a contract, successfully debate his case in court, or effectively pass a new law, the priest of Amaunator gave thanks to the Keeper of the Sun by burning magically preserved oak leaves and incense in his  honor.

Affiliated Orders: Amaunator had several affiliated orders with representative likely found in most Netherese communities. The Most Transcendent Affiliation of Paradisiacal Pens were an aloof and arrogant group of scribes that travelled the lands preaching about law and order. The Syndicate of Celestial and Righteous Lawmakers were a group of primarily paladins ,with a scattering of fighters and goodly militant clergy. These men and women taught the lawful side of Amaunator, interpreting his somewhat non-good tendencies as deific recommendations that could be safely ignored or softened to a more humanitarian tone. The monks of Amanuator belonged to the Brotherhood of the Sun, an association of off itinerant monks who served the faithful in the filed, bringing the comforting words of Amaunator to the peasants and common folk, preserving order throughout the land.

Priestly Vestments: Priests of Amaunator dressed in bright, long-sleeved, ornate robes of yellow, red, and orange that were covered with sewn-on arcane symbols for the sun or that depicted the sun through embroidery, artful dying, or gold decorations and gemstone encrustations placed to form a sun face. Those priests with their own temples had their robes worked of cloth- of-gold. A sunburst headpiece completed the ceremonial garb. Holy symbols of Amaunator were always made of gold, gold- plated metal, or gold-painted wood.

Adventuring Garb: Adventuring priests usually wore utilitarian garb, but preferred reds and oranges for cloaks, tabards, and accessories that were not part of their armor. When possible, they wore armor that had been washed or plated with gold.

« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:12:11 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2018, 05:59:13 am »

JANNATH
The Great Mother, the Grain Goddess, the Golden Goddess, She Who Shapes All, the Forest Mother, Guardian of the Wilds and Deeps, Earthmother, Keeper of the Wild
Symbol: A sheaf of golden wheat on a green field
Home Plane:Eronia/Great  Mother’s Garden
Alignment: Neutral Good
Portfolio:Wild nature, forests, wild animals, the sea and sea creatures, agriculture, cultivation, farmers, gardeners, the fundamental elements, summer
Worshippers:Though she has a diverse collection of followers, Jannath is worshipped by peasants, servants, druids, gardeners, and any others who earn pay from working on farmland.
Favored Weapon:Shock of grain ((Scythe))
Cleric Alignment:LG, NG, CG
NWN Domain: Animal, Earth, Good, Plant, Protection, Water

History Relationships:The hand of Jannath (JANN-nuth) was on every place where things grew, whether they were animals, crops, forests, or people. She was not a goddess given to spectacle or pageant, but rather called her followers to small acts of devotion. She was immense- ly popular among gardeners, farmers, and common folk of many nations. Through her blessing, Toril was fruitful and wildlife healthy and plentiful. She was wise and quiet, though not passive, and wasn’t given to hasty action.

Dogma:Jannath’s faith was one of nurture, growth, and the protection of the natural order. Agricultural homilies and folk wisdom dotted her teachings. Growing and reaping, the eternal cycle, was a common thread in Jannath’s faith. Destruction for its own sake, or leveling without rebuilding, was anathema to the church. Jannathan priests were charged to nurture, tend, and plant whenever and wherever possible; protect trees and plants, and save their seeds so that what was destroyed could be replaced; tend to animals, both wild and domestic; see to the fertility of the earth, but let the human womb see to its own; and to eschew the use of fire when possible.

Day-to-Day Activities: Priests of Jannath were charged to learn-and pass on to others, both fellow clergy and laity-all they could of horticulture, herb lore, plant types, plant diseases, animal husbandry, and wildlife lore. They encouraged all civilized folk to enrich the land by replanting, composting, and irrigation, not merely to graze or dig it bare for what it could yield and then pass on. They replanted trees wherever they went, rooted out weeds that strangled and choked crop plants, tilled plants back into the soil, cared for sick and injured creatures, and worked to prevent the spread of disease. They strove to let no day pass in which they didn’t help a living thing flourish.
They sometimes hired nonbelievers to help them burn diseased plants or the corpses of plague-ridden livestock to prevent the spread of sickness. They kept careful watch over such blazes, since uncon- trolled blazes could wreak such destruction on the earth. They were not forbidden to use fire, but were especially careful in their use of it. Jannath encouraged her faithful to make offerings of food to strangers and those in need, freely sharing the bounty of the land. It was also said that money given to one of her temples returned to the giver tenfold. Worshipers were supposed to plant at least one seed or small plant-cutting a tenday, tend it faithfully for as long as possible, and see that their own wastes were always tilled back into the soil to feed later life. Any extra seeds yielded by plantings was taken to a temple of the goddess for distribution to the less fortunate. Worshipers were also cautioned never to take lightly the burden of caring for an animal to which they had made
a commitment, such as a pet, mount, or domesticated animal.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Jannath for continued life and close with a prayer to the mountains, from whence (Jannathans believe) the Great Mother sent her power. Prayer to the Great Mother was made whenever things were planted or born, but oth- erwise occurred when worshipers were moved to do so by the beauty of nature around them, which they were always encour- aged to notice. Prayer to the Golden Goddess was best made on freshly tilled ground, farmland, or a garden, or failing that, at least at a well or watering place. Jannath listened best to those who enriched the ground, so before prayer many priests buried wastes, disposed of the litter of civilization, or planted seeds.
Few ceremonies of worship fell at set times. Passing one’s wed- ding night in a freshly tilled field was held by Jannathans to ensure fertility in marriage. Greengrass was a fertility festival, wherein uninhibited behavior and consumption of food and drink was encouraged. The much more solemn High Prayers of the Harvest celebrated the bounty Jannath had given a community and were held at different times in each community to coincide  with  the actual harvest of crops, rather than precisely on Higharvestide.

Affiliated Orders: An affiliated order of militant rangers, called the Timberland Resistance Brigade, was one of the most feared groups within 100 miles of the monastery. (The Timberland Resistance Brigade didn’t call itself that; its members called them- selves Jannath’s Defenders.) They were feared in Grog and Imbrue as “murderers who wantonly massacred entrepreneurs.” In fact, the government of Fluvion once put a price on the head of every member of the Timberland Resistance Brigade. They were staunch defenders of the wild, but not evil, contrary to what the Fluvion government loudly proclaimed. Another order supposedly affiliated with the worship of Jannath, though not with the monastery on the Glorifier, was a sect of druids that were often termed gray druids, though they preferred the name they chose themselves: Nature’s Reprisal. These druids, specialists in polymorph spells of all kinds, were also believed to be wizards. Tales of Nature’s Reprisal claimed its members altered the form of their opponents into trees, brush, grass, or harmless herbivorous herd animals. Groundcover’s monks didn’t claim to be in league with Nature’s Reprisal and believed the group was actually in allegiance with Moander. The Moanderites neither claimed the group nor denied its affiliation with their god.

Priestly Vestments: Priests of high rank of all types in the service of Jannath tended to favor off-white or maize-colored cer- emonial robes trimmed in deep forest green and used staves smoothed by much handling but otherwise natural in  appear- ance. Some such staves were enchanted to purify or promote the growth of what they  touched.

Adventuring Garb: Jarmath’s priests dressed simply and without pretense most of the time. They favored earth tones of green and brown. The most commonly encountered garb was simple brown robes, with high rank denoted only by a belt laced with gold thread or some other similar, precious decoration.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:12:37 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2018, 06:00:02 am »

JERGAL
Lord of the End of Everything, Lord of Bones, Lord of the Dead, Protector of the Names of the Dead, Guardian of Tombs, Scribe of the Doomed, the Pitiless One, King of the Walking Dead, Nakasr
Symbol:Skull, scroll, and quill
Home Plane:Oinos/Bone Castle
Alignment: Lawful Evil
Portfolio:Death, the dead, order in death, funerals and tombs, undeath, the undead, wasting, old age, exhaustion, tyranny, dusk
Worshippers:Priests of Jergal served as scribes, funerary workers, and morticians. The church of Jergal was feared and respected, though not automatically hated by the average person, He was perceived as a compassionless steward of death who visited mortals at their appointed time and transported them to the appropriate realm in the afterlife.
Favored Weapon:A white glove (scythe)
Cleric Alignment:LE, LN, NE
NWN Domain: Death, Destruction, Evil, Heal, Travel

History/Relationships:Jergal (JER-gal), Lord of the End of Everything, was the power who presided over death, the dead, and undeath. He was responsible for keeping records on the final resting place of all the dead, and strove for order in death, anticipating the ever- encroaching termination of all things living. As the Judge of the Damned and the Grim Reaper, it was said that only Jergal knew the final disposition of every spirit and the day of every being’s final death, and he was never wrong. The ultimate tyrant, no one unintentionally escaped Jergal’s grasp once they fell under the aegis of his portfolio. He was very jealous of his position, and even those of other faiths who sought to resurrect companions had to placate him or risk his retribution. Jergal had a cordial relationship with Amaunator, valuing that ancient sun god’s adherence to law and order and his dominion over the more general field of rulership, and he worked grudgingly with Tyche, as fate sometimes had a hand in the time of a mortal’s death. He admired the ineffable evil and seductive Power, grace of Shar and had formally courted her  on  several  occasions, though he was well aware of the many attempts she made  to  manipulate him. 

The priesthood of Jergal was known as the Scriveners of Doom. Within their ranks, the high priest of each temple was known as First Scrivener of Doom, but otherwise the faith eschewed titles or ranks. Monks of Jergal served in the temple to provide additional support for the priesthood’s recordkeeping tasks and as guards of important items, people, and areas.
 
Dogma:The church taught that people had an eternal resting place that was chosen for them at the moment of their creation. Life was a process of seeking that place and eternal rest. Existence was but a brief aberration in an eternity of death. Power, success, and joy were as transitory as weakness, failure, and misery. Only death was absolute, and then only at its appointed hour. Followers should seek to bring order to the chaos of life, for in death there was finality and a fixedness of state. Be ready for death for it is at hand and uncompromising. Life should be prolonged only when it served the greater cause of the death of the world. Undeath was not an escape or a reward; it was simply a duty of a chosen few who served the Lord of the End of Everything.

Day-to-Day Activities: The Scriveners of Doom spent their days maintaining and extending vast archives of scrolls listing how sentients under their purview passed away and their destination in the afterlife. Despite their near hopeless task, they toiled on undaunted, knowing they had eons to complete their appointed task. They also took on such recordkeeping duties and burial tasks as the high priest of their temple agreed to per- form for different groups or individuals. They kept tax rolls; recorded births, deaths, and the genealogy of noble lines; embalmed, mummified, cremated, and buried the dead; put down uncontrolled undead creatures or animated and con- trolled undead work forces to perform hired labor tasks to benefit the temple (strategically or financially). Many priests of Jergal were primarily morticians and prepared the dead for burial; those who did not provide financially for a proper burial with the church or their heirs were sometimes used as brute labor after their demise for a set period to repay the church for their funerals and the future care of their remains. (Those who offended the church were also said to turn up in zombie and skeleton work crews.)
The Scriveners of Doom also accepted prearranged agreements, in certain cases performing a raise dead or resurrection on individuals who had prepaid and contracted for the service in the event of their death. The price of such a contract was set at the discretion of the high priest of a temple. They even traveled to distant places to recover the body if a revivification contract had been signed, though reimbursement for unusual expenses incurred was made in coin or temple service after a being was revived. Jergali priests didn’t raise those who had met their final end in Jergal’s judgment. They were informed by Jergal when such an event had happened, and if they had already taken a contract to raise such a being, they refunded the prepayment to the being’s heirs.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Jergal’s faithful had lit- tle patience or need for holy days or religious ceremonies other than the formal and proper funeral rites, viewing them as unnec- essary distractions. The funeral rite they were required to per- form was known as the Sealing. In it they placed the remains of the deceased (whether mummified, cremated, embalmed, or otherwise prepared) in their resting place and impressed a large wax seal with the sign of Jergal over the casket lid, stone block sealing the burial chamber, urn containing the ashes, etc. They sprinkled this seal with powdered ash and bone while it was warm and intoned a prayer to Jergal.
 
On the last night of the year, the 30th of Nightal, Jergal’s clergy ceased their endless toil for a full night. On this holy night known as the Night of Another Year, they passed in procession to a crypt, mausoleum, or graveyard carrying all the scrolls and books containing every name whose death they had recorded over the past year. At midnight each priest began reading aloud every name whose death they had recorded over the past year. When the last name was intoned, all the priests invoked Jergal, crying “One year ended; one year closer,” three times, bowed their heads, and returned to their duties, taking the scrolls and books to be properly filed.
Major Centers of  Worship:  The largest and oldest temple of Jergal was located in Seventon. It was a gray granite struc- ture of exactingly geometric design consisting of a large mortu- ary, a temple, a huge necropolis, and several small attached communal-living buildings in which those people who made their livings as professional mourners dwelled. It was said to be guarded by undead of fearsome number and strength who only attacked at the bidding of a Scrivener of Doom. Its high priest was an ancient mummy of tremendous power whom no one saw except other Jergali priests. The temple, known as the Vaults of Doom, was said to guard the wealth of a hundred thousand noble burials.

Affiliated Orders: The Jergali church had two affiliated groups: the Companions of the Pallid Mask and the Hand of Jergal. The Companions of the Pallid Mask were a group of Jergali priests who specialized in combating or commanding the undead. They eliminated undead creatures whose existence was not sanctioned by the church or who had proven to be trouble- some. They also were the supervisors of the skeleton and zom- bie work crews that the church sometimes ran to profit itself. The Hand of Jergal was an elite group of fanatic priests who led others under their command to avenge slights upon the church  of Jergal at the direction of a high priest. They acted against those of other faiths who raised or resurrected someone with- out paying due tribute to Jergal or who violated or looted a tomb under the protection of the church.

Priestly Vestments: Jergal’s clergy shaved their heads smooth and garbed themselves in unadorned gray robes and long, white gloves. At important ceremonies or when they felt the need to impress, high-level priests favored masks with smooth, pale, faces and bulbous eyes that resembled those of a praying mantis. At all times they carried a satchel of scrolls, inks, and quills. Each priest carried a polished skull formed into a container. The skull held a simple mixture of ash and powdered bones for use during Sealing rituals. The skull or a depiction of it also served as the Jergali holy symbol.

Adventuring Garb: Jergal’s priests wore any armor that they wished to protect themselves. Such protection was irrelevant to the Lord of the End of Everything, since all beings died at their appointed time, regardless of what protections they took to the contrary. Jergali priests favored voluminous  gray  overcloaks and white gloves or gauntlets and emblazoned the skull of Jergal on their shields or breastplates or embroidered it on their cloaks.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:13:09 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2018, 06:00:39 am »

KOZAH
The Destroyer, the Raging One, the Stormstar, the Storm Lord, the Wildfire, Bhaelros
Symbol:A stylized lightning bolt on a crimson field between two flanking horizontal white bars- Thanks to Gmork for the image
Home Plane:Pandesmos/Towers of Ruin
Alignment: Chaotic Evil
Portfolio:Storms, destruction, rebellion, strife, ravaging beasts and monsters, hurricanes, ocean storms, blizzards, vortices, conflagrations, earthquakes
Worshippers: The god of storms, forest fires, earthquakes, tornadoes, hurricanes, and general destruction. He attracts the destroyer, the raider, the looter, the brigand, and the rabble-rouser among his followers.
Favored Weapon:Lightning Bolt ((Spear))
Cleric Alignment:CE, CN, NE
NWN Domain: Air, Destruction, Evil, Fire, Water

History Relationships: Kozah (KOH-zah) was the destructive force of nature. Kozah’s name was most often invoked by individuals who  wished to escape his attentions, not suffer them; however, he had more than a few direct followers who supported and encouraged his depredations. His established clergy was itinerant for the most part and preached by warning of dooms and disasters to come. Frequently his priests were right in their predictions because either they or Kozah ensured that  they came true. This didn’t make his clergy members terribly popu- lar—yet another reason why they tended to travel a lot. The most favorable reception Kozahyn priests received was with the oppressed Netherese, whom were often encouraged to riot and rebellion by the words of Kozah’s priests.
The church of Kozah exulted in the wild destruction of  nature at its fiercest. Clergy and the faithful tended to be fatalistic in nature as a result—almost self-destructive. However, priests of Kozah usually wished to take  as  many  others  with them as possible. The protections the Storm Lord conferred upon his clergy made the priesthood of the Destroyer popular with many folk who exulted in the feeling  of power—or  who just liked to destroy things. All would-be priests of the Storm Lord were confirmed to his service through the manifestation of Kozah as two small storm clouds. The clouds struck a sup- plicant with a red lightning stroke that did no harm, and it was revealed to the supplicant’s mind that she or he was indeed chosen to serve the Stormstar. This was referred to as being “Touched by Kozah.”
Specialty priests of Kozah were known  as  stormlords. (a title used irrespective of gender). Typica1 titles used by clergy of Kozah, in ascending order of rank, were: Storm Supplicant, Weatherwise, Talon (full, confirmed priest), Lord/Lady of Fury, Eye of the Storm, Reaver, Stormherald (high priest), High Stormherald, and Weathermaster/Weathermistress. The spells of a Stormherald relating directly to natural forces (such as   call lightning and flame strike) dealt double the normal dam- age, and so the uppermost three titles in this list were honors bestowed and confirmed by Kozah, not ranks  that  priests dared to assume for themselves—for Kozah destroyed those who spoke against his will.
Many Kozahyn temples and shrines were secret because of the reputation of the church; the worship of Kozah was out- lawed by many archwizards. Where there were public temples to Kozah, many of them took the form of castles or walled compounds because they often served as strongholds that the faithful of Kozah could defend against angry folk.

Dogma:: Kozah the Destroyer was the dark side of nature, the uncaring and destructive force that lay waiting to strike at any time. Kozahyns were taught that life was a combination of random effects and chaos, so the  devout  should  grab  what they could, when they could, as who could say when Kozah would strike and bring them into the afterlife?
Kozahyn clergy were to preach to all of the might of Kozah, warning them always of the forces only  he could  command— the fury of all Faerûn. They were never to cease in  such  speech, so that everyone could know that Kozah was to be worshipped by all, and that in time to come he must be, or he would destroy all life with the forces at his command. His cler- gy should walk unafraid in all storms, forest fires, earthquakes, and other disasters, for the power of Kozah protected them. They were to let others see this whenever possible, so that unbelievers would come to believe in the true power of almighty Kozah.

Kozahyn clergy made all fear Kozah by showing the destruction that he and all of his servants could cause. To avoid tast- ing his fury, they were to pray to him energetically and tell  all folk that such observances—and only such observances— could protect them from the furies of gales, hailstorms, winds, floods, droughts, blizzards, hurricanes, and other natural dooms. Such forces could also be hurled at one’s foes-an advancing orc horde, for instance—if Kozah deemed a place or a person worth defending. So one couldn’t afford to ignore Kozah, but should bow down and worship him. The clergy of Kozah were to proclaim this message to all and show everyone the destruction even the slightest of the servants  of  Kozah could inflict.

Day-to-Day Activities: Kozah always had too few wor- shipers for his liking, so his clergy was sent out into the world to spread word of his might and to recruit others to his wor- ship—either out of fear or because such people enjoyed the wielding of raw power. As examples to all, the fatalistic priests of Kozah tended to indulge in acts of random or spiteful destruction as they traveled and to make examples of all folk who stood up to them or tried to prevent them from entering a community or passing along a road. Some priests pillaged, burned, and stole as enthusiastically as any brigand, and ham- lets that fought them off tended to be visited a season or so   later by a gathering of Kozahyn priests who tried to slaughter everyone and lay waste to the place.
Kozah didn’t seem to mind priests who indulged in fulfilling personal desires for wealth, food, luxury items, and wanton behavior so long as they called up a storm or engaged in random, spectacular acts of violence once every tenday or so (toppling towers was always effective). As a result, some clergy took up a life of brigandage. They posed as lunatics in order to spread the word of Kozah as ordered, and the rest of the  time they adopted disguises to scout out rich prizes to strike at.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Kozahyns  marked  all of the annual festivals (Greengrass, Midsummer, and so on) with rituals that called down lightning or called up storms. Calling Down the Thunder was the most sacred of these ritu- als and involved the slaying of an intelligent  being  by lightning in return for the Storm Lord granting a special boon. This boon was usually the bestowal of a spell normally beyond a Kozahyn priest’s ability to receive and wield, but it was sometimes a deed such as the sending of a storm down  on  a  particular locale or being named by the  priest.
A more frequently seen ritual was the Fury, which was sim- ply a berserk attack on folk and items made while howling the name of Kozah repeatedly. It began and ended with a prayer (if the priest survived) and usually involved the hurling of spells and of lit, carried torches, in an effort to visit considerable destruction on a place or encampment within a short time. It was considered most holy when performed by a lone Kozahyn priest—but against formidable foes, clergy of Kozah usually attacked together or drew off defenders by creating illusory attackers in one direction and mounting their own real attack from another.

Affiliated Orders:
Many brigand bands, reavers, and  raiders paid tribute to Kozah and his  priesthood,  but  none were organized enough to really be called an affiliated order. Kozah had an order of powerful and odiously dispositioned mages who call themselves the Doomsayers. They delighted in casting the most destructive spells in the midst of cities when- ever possible and for no apparent reason but personal merri- ment. Membership in this order was said to exceed 70, but actual figures were difficult to judge Membership in this order tended to be short-lived, however, as its members were relent- lessly hunted down. The last known Doomsayer was killed in 3189 NY through the work of an extensive alliance of good- aligned beings.

Priestly Vestments: High priests of Kozah wore ceremoni- al robes of dark blue and white streaked with crimson that   seem to crackle with lightning due to a minor illusory glamour, but all other priests dressed in robes and cloaks of black shot through with teardrops and jagged lines of gold or silver. The robes had jagged hems and rough, uneven sleeves.

Adventuring Garb: It should be noted that clergy of Kozah enjoyed destruction and armed themselves heavily at all times to bring it about where spells may fail. When not involved in ceremonies, Kozahyns tended to go to one of two  extremes: Either they armored themselves to the hilt in the most menac- ing-looking armor they could obtain, or they wore next to no armor and used protective magics instead so that to average observers they looked almost suicidal in  their  fervor
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:13:39 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2018, 06:01:14 am »

MOANDER
The Darkbringer, the Jawed God, the Rotting God, the Great Dread God
Symbol:An upright male human right hand, fingers
outstretched, with an open human female fanged mouth, lips parted as though speaking, set in its palm
Home Plane:Rarandreth/Offalmound
Alignment: Chaotic Evil
Portfolio:Rotting death, decay, corruption, parasites
Worshippers:Moander attracted those who feared decay in themselves or the world around them and hoped to placate Moander to stave it off; it also attracted the nihilists who saw all of existence as a constant decay toward death.
Favored Weapon:Mace
Cleric Alignment:CE,NE, LE
NWN Domain: Animal, Death, Destruction, Evil, Plant

History Relationships: Moander (Moe-AN-der) was the god of rot, corruption, and decay. It wasn’t known whether Moander was male, female, or utterly beyond gender, and because of this most texts referred to the god by the neutral “it.” It was a corrupt isolation of one part of the whole cycle of birth, death, and renewal, an obsessive focus on the descending edge of the circle of life. The Darkbringer was a cruel and petty tyrant who enjoyed tormenting lesser beings and making them destroy that which they held most dear. Moander frequently lied, particularly when such prevarications caused great emotional distress in its victims. The Darkbringer sought to control every aspect of its worshipers’ lives, viewing them only as puppets. It sought to corrupt and destroy all who didn’t bow down before it.

Dogma: Minions of the Darkbringer were charged to feed Great Moander with fresh corpses of their own making. They were to hew down strong plants and trees to feed It. Moander’s priests were charged to keep the lands in which it manifested and held power as warm as possible. When a novice was first initiated into the priesthood and possessed by a seed of Moander, the Darkbringer instructed him or her through hor- rific dreams as follows: “Seek not to question the ways and words of Moander, lest you be stricken by the Eating From Within. Go forth and possess beings of power and influence for me. Slay, and let the rot cover all. Fight against cold with fire and magic. Fear me, and obey.”

Day-to-Day Activities: Moander’s Minions were a secre- tive, proud clergy that scoured the land for  malformed  life (such as mongrelmen and diseased plants and beasts) and brutish, destructive beings (orcs and the like) to feed to Moander. Cultists of Moander strove to spread intelligent veg- etable life throughout the Realms, including algoids, sham- bling mounds, gibbering mouthers, and vegepygmies (russet mold).
Minions of Moander existed to feed the manifestations of the god, whose decaying powers quickly destroyed  any  body  it  they animated (always a tangled mass of carrion, dead or dis- eased plants, and the like). Minions were thus always kept busy building new bodies, leading the old ones to fresh food, or infecting other mortals to become new Minions. In rituals and spell-weavings in secluded wilderness ravines and caves, they built the Great Dread God endless new bodies to possess in its manifestation as the Abomination: triangular pyramids of decaying vegetation, dung, and rotting corpses. Moander ani- mated a “body” as the Abomination in a sacred ritual requiring but a single drop of blood from a living seed that granted the casting priest instant favor and promotion. To begin the ritual, the priest brought one of Moander’s living seeds to the new body. Living seeds were sentient mammals or reptiles of high intelligence and good alignment who had been possessed by a seed of Moander and who had (at least temporarily) survived the process.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: The church of Moander had no calendar-related high holy days except the Balefire. Always held on the first of Hammer, the Balefire cele- brated the will of Moander’s servants to hold back the cold by building huge bonfires in its honor-fires at which the god  always manifested to thank them, to deliver inspirational sermons, and to charge them with missions to further its power during the cold months.

Affiliated Orders: The church of Moander had an affiliated association of wizards who specialized in spells and magical items that caused afflictions, boils, and the weakening of bodies called the Contagion of Moander. The Contagions were special- ists in discovering new and virulent diseases to plague the world-mainly  their  enemies.

Priestly Vestments: Moander’s priests wore cowled robes of mottled green and brown trimmed with natural vines, sym- bolizing Moander’s growth from decay, and faceless masks of white with a single eye painted in the forehead and surrounded by teeth. All senior clergy wore copper-hued robes enchanted so as to afford food for a creeping fungus growth that moved slow- ly and continuously over them; only the Master Minion had a “bare” copper robe. The Master Minion also wore an animal skull draped in black moss or moldering willow boughs. The Mouth of Moander wore a clean white robe bearing the red- embroidered device of an eye surrounded by an open fanged mouth on his or her breast. As puppets of the Darkbringer, all of Moander’s Minions sported a flowered tendril emerging from one ear and wrapped throughout their hair.

Adventuring Garb: When adventuring, Minions of Moander dressed practically in the best armor they could find. Most wore as much of their ceremonial garb as possible without drawing attention to themselves. Some enjoyed pretending to be druids and dressed appropriately, wielding scimitars. Others favored nondescript brown and green clothing and wielded cudgels inlaid with shards shaped to resemble fangs

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2018, 06:01:48 am »

Mystryl
The Lady  of Mysteries,  the Muse, the Mother of All Magic, Our Lady of Spells, the Hidden One
Symbol: A single blue-white star
Home Plane: Limbo/Dweomertor
Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
Portfolio: Magic, spells, the weave, wizards, spellcast- ers, energy, creativity, knowledge, invention, song,  time, spring[/b]
Worshippers: She was most venerated by wizards and those who used magic or magical items in their daily use. She was the goddess of the essential force that made all spellcasting possible. She provided and tended the Weave, the conduit that enabled mortal spellcasters and magical crafters to safely access the raw force that is magic.
Favored Weapon:
Cleric Alignment:Any
NWN Domain: Air, Knowledge, Magic, Trickery

History Relationships: Mystryl (MISS-trihl) was the goddess of magic, spells, creativity, invention, and knowledge. She was said to have taught the first spellcaster of the Realms. All spells of all types were known to her when their creators constructed them, and her bountiful creative spirit was said to imbue all inventors, authors, song- writers, and artists. She was the goddess of the essential force that made all spellcasting possible. She provided and tended the Weave, the conduit that enabled mortal spellcasters and magical crafters to safely  access the raw force that is magic. She distrusted but didn’t hate Shar, who had sought to seize control over her for centuries, and she also rebelled occasionally against the good-intentioned suggestions of Selune, who she regarded as smotheringly maternal at times. Kozah and Moander, who seemed always intent on ruining that which she created or inspired, were her mortal enemies.

Dogma: Choice, decision, and knowledge were the hallmarks of Mystryl’s faith. Magic was great power, and it brought with it great responsibility. Mystryl’s clergy were given the following charge upon aspiring to the faith:
“Love magic for itself, not just as a ready weapon to reshape the Realms to your will. Play with magic and learn how best to wield it, but remember always that magic is an Art, the Gift of the Lady, and that those who can wield it are privileged in the extreme. Conduct yourself with dignity and with forethought while being mindful of this.
“Seek always both to learn new magic and to create new magic, but experimenting to learn to craft something  oneself  is better than merely buying scrolls or hiring tutors. Exult more in creation than in hurling spells, and ensure that your creations are shared with others and so outlive you. Those serve the Lady best and are most favored in her eyes will serve her beyond death as beings who have become one with magic and live on in it forever.”

Day-to-Day Activities: Mystrylan clergy worked hard to preserve all magical lore in secret libraries, private safeholds, well- guarded research laboratories, and small, hidden stashes so that magic flourished in the future. Mystrylans also searched out beings skilled in spell use, seeking to keep watch on the identi- ties, powers, and behavior of individuals likely to become magic- wielders of importance.
All clergy of Mystryl devised their own new magic upon gain- ing sufficient experience, and they were expected to do so. In this way magical study remained a growing, vibrant thing of wonder.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies:
Worship  of Mystryl  tended to be a personal thing rather than a series of calendar rituals. For some arcanists whom the goddess counted as devout believers, it never went beyond a whispered prayer of thanks to her with each spell. For Mystryl, that was enough. The  goddess  gained both delight and strength, however, from beings who did more in reverence to her.Two ceremonies of personal significance stood out: Starflight and  Magefire. Starflight was often used as an initiation when an individual joined the priesthood of Mystryl or a celebration when two worshipers were wed. Magefire was renewal; it was the exciting feeling of great magi- cal power surging through one’s body, blazing out as flickering blue fire as it spilled forth, cleansing and renewing.

Affiliated Orders: A very few arcanist guilds-probably as few as an arcanist has fingers on one hand-were strong allies with the church of Mystryl. They knew magic was controlled and supplemented by her power and grace. These guilds were very careful of whom they allowed to become members, and even  then, only those with a love for Mystryl were allowed to control positions of power. They affiliated themselves with the nearest church of Mystryl and aided the clergy in any way they could. Often used as spies for the temple, the guilds reported on magical developments and often procured samples for the church’s use and cataloging. The church also sponsored a small order of rangers and of bards. The rangers, known as the Mystryl’s Eyes, received their spells from Mystryl herself. They served as long-range scouts and spies for the church, and also dealt with magical threats that threatened the natural order of things, such as unloosed tanar’ri and baatezu and creatures born of irresponsible wizardly exper- imentation. The bards, members of the Collegium Mysterium, traveled from place to place gathering and disseminating information and testifying to the glory of Mystryl through song and deed.

Priestly Vestments: The ceremonial garb of Mystrylan priests was simple blue robes that sparkled and glistened mystically of their own accord or displayed flowing rainbows of color. They were accented by a cloak of deep blue in colder climates. Mystrylans went bare-headed, and usually wore their hair long, whether male or female, though either gender frequently caught their hair at the nape of the neck with a hair ornament or tie of some kind. The blue-white star of Mystryl was worn most typi- cally on a ring or as a necklace to serve as a holy symbol. The use of mantles and scepters (those used by the archwizards and other arcanists) was quite common.

Adventuring Garb: In the field, priests of Mystryl wore armor and bore the symbol of Mystryl on their shields or embroidered on their clothes as a display of their faith. If armor was inappropriate, they dressed in the fashion of the region they were in.
« Last Edit: September 02, 2018, 11:54:51 pm by Tinker »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #8 on: January 24, 2018, 06:02:21 am »

SELUNE
Our Lady  of Silver,  the Moonmaiden, the Night White Lady, She Who Guides, Elah
Symbol: Two darkly beautiful human female eyes surrounded by a circle of seven silver stars
Home Plane: Ysgard/Gates of the Moon
Alignment: Chaotic Good
Portfolio: Moon, moonlight, stars, dreams, purity, beau- ty, love, marriage, navigation, navigators, tracking, wanderers, seekers, diviners, good and neutral lycanthropes, autumn
Worshippers: Selûne is worshipped by a mixed bag of followers: navigators, sailors, women, female spellcasters (especially those born under a full moon or interested in divination), good and neutral-aligned lycanthropes, those who work honestly at night, those seeking protection from Shar, the lost, the questing, and those curious about the future. Couples look to Selûne to bless them with children when they are ready, and women look to her for courage, strength, and guidance. The demands she places on her followers are few, and the goddess is reputed to be free with her gifts and boons to mortals.
Favored Weapon: Rod of Four Moons (Mace)
Cleric Alignment: CG, NG, CN, LG
NWN Domain: Good, Healing, Protection, Travel

History Relationships: Selûne’s foe was the evil goddess Shar, and she battled her ceaselessly on many planes of existence, both through mortal worshipers and servitor creatures. The undying enmity between the two goddesses predated the existence of all other Faerûnian deities. The enmity between Shar and Selune carried into their priesthoods, such that open battle often occurred when follow- ers of each faith met.

Dogma: Selûne’s ethos seemed to be one of acceptance and tolerance over any other overriding principle. All were to be made welcome in her faith and seen as equal, and fellow Selûnites were to be aided freely, as if they were one’s dearest friends. “May Selûne guide your steps in the night, and bring them to the new dawn” was the common blessing of priests of Selûne to the faithful.
Novices were charged with the words of the goddess: “Let all on whom my light falls be welcome if they desire to be so. As the silver moon waxes and wanes, so too does all life. Trust in my radiance, and know that all love alive under my light shall know my blessing. Turn to the moon, and I will be your true guide.”

Day-to-Day Activities: Priests of Selûne spent their time wandering Faerûn reaching out to the faithful and to potential worshipers of the moon goddess, since Selûne could be worshipped anywhere on the surface world. They made much small coin by telling fortunes, because folk who tried to read the stars never achieved the same success rate in predictions as did clergy members who could call on Selûne for real guidance.
Members of the Selûnite priesthood also faced lycanthropes fearlessly and thereby won respect among farmers and other members of the common folk. They were also, by the Lady’s command, generous with their healing, often charging very little beyond a meal and a warm place to sleep for straightforward healing. Selûne’s way thus made the goddess ever more popular and kept her clergy hardy, well-traveled, and in practical touch with the natural world.
The Moonmaiden’s clergy were encouraged to be self-reliant, humble, and yet make as much of a success as they could in the world while always remaining as helpful and friendly to the lonely and to decent folk as possible. By this long-sighted policy Selûne allowed her clergy to become happy, fulfilled, important people. Self-reliance and finding one’s own, practical path were more important than fussy detail in her faith, and so Selûne was also popular among eccentrics, adventurers, and mavericks of all sorts, including outcasts.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Selûnite clergy embroidered their rituals into quite individual, unique observances. The basics of these were open-air dances and prayers under the moonlight with offerings of milk and wine poured upon a central altar during the nights of every full moon and new moon. These rituals were often called night stalks and during them her priests reaffirmed their closeness to the Night White Lady and communed with her when possible.
The most sacred ritual of Selûne was the Mystery of the Night. The Mystery of the Night was required to be performed at least once a year by every priest.

Affiliated Orders: One long-standing knightly order of fanatic Selûnites was known as the Swords of the Lady; its members were often referred to colloquially as the Lunatics. They tended to act rapidly in response to threats from Shar and her priesthood, although their behavior was often viewed as bizarre by the public at large. Other, less fanatic knightly orders, included the Silver Path, a group of rangers, and the Guardians of Light, an elite order of paladins.

Priestly Vestments: The ceremonial dress of Selûnite priests consisted of a circlet woven of vines or flowers and white robes either of simplest white or decorated with moonstones and silver embroidery. No shoes were worn at ceremonies. The symbol of office of a high priest was a staff of wood wound about with silver and vines and flowers formed of silver and tipped with a moonstone. The symbol of Selûne was usually carved into a moonstone and incorporated into a piece of jewelry for use as a holy symbol.

Adventuring Garb: In the field, the clergy members of the Selûnite church dressed practically for the task they were under- taking. The tended to dress fashionably, but not gaudily, in day-to- day life. The preferred weapon of the clergy of Selûne was a smooth-headed mace called the moon’s hand. The moon’s hand had identical statistics to a standard footman’s mace, though it gained special combat bonuses in the hands of a specialty priest of Selûne.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:14:16 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #9 on: January 24, 2018, 06:02:47 am »

SHAR
Mistress of the Night, the Lady of Loss, Nightsinger, the Unseen Lady, the Dark Traitor, the Shadowy Seductress
Symbol: A glistening purple eye outlined in black with a black pupil or a cowled hunting cloak of unadorned black stretched out flat
Home Plane: Niflheim/Palace of Loss
Alignment: Neutral Evil
Portfolio: Dark, night, hatred, loss, forgetfulness, sleep, nightmares, illusions, lies, trickery, unrevealed secrets, hiding places, betrayal, treachery, seduction, thieves, thievery, murder, winter
Worshippers: Shar was worshipped by those who wished to trick or control others through illusions, lies, betrayal, treachery, seduction, or threat of murder; being in control of a situation or being the one pulling everyone else’s strings was very important to Sharrans. She was worshipped by blinded, nocturnal, or sub- terranean-dwelling humans and allied beings and by those who hated light. She was also worshipped by many who favored dark surroundings or who undertook deeds or did business in darkness, such as thieves. She was venerated by those who were bitter or were grieving over a loss and wished to find peace (especially through vengeance) and by individuals who wanted to forget. She was also placated by those who knew their wits had been harmed and wanted to find peace or those who had been mentally harmed  and wanted  to remember  fully or be restored in their minds. Many in Faerûn feared nightfall, the casting of the cloak of Shar, because of the dangers that lurked in its folds.
Favored Weapon: The Disk of Night (Shurikan)
Cleric Alignment:NE, LE, CE
NWN Domain: Evil, Knowledge, Magic, Trickery

History Relationships: Shar was a schemer and manipulator. Her philosophies made Moander and Kozah easy compatriots for her schemes, and Targus was hopelessly smitten by her beauty and thus easily led to whatever action she wished him to take. She was the mortal enemy of Selûne and battled her ceaselessly. The undying enmity between the two goddesses is older than recorded time, and neither deity would forgive or forget. Shar disliked Amaunator intensely for both the light he brought and his unyielding nature.

Dogma: Dark Followers (the faithful of Shar) were instruct- ed to reveal secrets only to fellow faithful and to never follow hope or turn to promises of success. They were to quench the light of the moon (the faithful of Selûne and  their  holdings, deeds, and magic) whenever they found it and  hide  from  it  when they couldn’t prevail. Above all, the dark was a time to act, not to wait. Faithful of Shar were not supposed to hope and were there- fore forbidden to strive to better their lot in life or to plan ahead except in matters directly overseen by the clergy of the Dark Goddess. Consorting with beings of good alignment who actively served their deities was a sin unless undertaken to take advantage of them in purely business dealings or to corrupt them from their beliefs and into the service of Shar. Devotees of Shar couldn’t speak out against clergy of the goddess, nor interrupt their devotional dances for any reason. Lay worshipers were required to prove their faith by obedience to the clergy and by carrying out at least one dark deed ordered by a priest of Shar every year—or bringing at least one being to believe in, and worship, the Dark Goddess

Day-to-Day Activities: The clergy of Shar seemed to pur- sue practical, local goals designed to further the power of the priesthood and of those who worshipped Shar, rather than to openly oppose other faiths (save that of Selûne). Shar desired to bring all humans under her sway by promoting general law- lessness and strife. In this way, most folk would suffer loss and turn to her for peace—especially through vengeance—and the influence of all other faiths would be  lessened.
Specifically, Sharran clergy were enjoined to work covertly to bring down and corrupt all governments, particularly within cities, and to publicize Shar’s patronage of avengers so that the desperate and despairing humans of other faiths turned to her   to get revenge. Sponsorship of thieving guilds and hedonistic clubs of all sorts was a key part of this assault on order, as was the encouragement of political intrigue  everywhere.
Shar’s love of secrecy was strong. Her clergy worked toward fulfilling her desire for secrecy by always acting through manipulation and behind-closed-doors intrigue. They also worked through and promoted shadowy cabals and organizations that appealed to human desires to be a part of something elite and important, to keep secrets, and to be involved in the mysterious.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies:  As so many  devotees of Shar kept their faith secret (and this secrecy was encouraged by senior clergy), the Sharran faith had no set holy days aside from the Feast of the Moon. To Dark Followers (the faithful of Shar) this holiday was known as the Rising of the Dark. They gathered on it under cover of the more widespread venerations of the dead to witness a blood sacrifice and learn of any plots or aims the clergy wanted them to work toward during the winter ahead.
The most important Sharran ritual of worship was Nightfall, the coming of darkness. Clergy held this ritual every night. It consisted of a brief invocation, a dance, a charge or series of inspiring instructions from the goddess spoken by one of the clergy, and a revel celebrated by eating, drinking, and dancing together. Lay worshipers were required to attend at least one Nightfall (or dance to the goddess themselves) and had to per- form—and report to their fellows—at least one small act of wickedness in salute to the Lady every tenday. On moonless nights, Nightfall was known as the Coming of the Lady, and every congregation carried out some significant act of vengeance or wickedness in the Dark Lady’s name.
The most important ceremony of the priesthood of Shar was the Kiss of Shar, a horrific night-long revel of slaying and doing dark deeds in the name of the lady that ended with a feast at dawn.

Affiliated Orders
: Clergy of the Sharran faith who had  killed one of the clergy of Selûne were rumored to gain access to an honorary order or secret society known as the Dark Justiciars. The Dark Justiciars were rumored to be able to cast he illusion/phantasm spells that nightbringers could cast at heir full skill level, rather than at half their level. Many thieves’ guilds also had strong connections to Sharran cells, and such affiliated guilds were used by Sharran cells for particular plots mercilessly.

Priestly Vestments: All Sharran priests either  had  black hair or dyed or ensorcelled their hair to a black hue. The colors purple and black were used extensively in Shar’s church and among her followers. Most Sharran clergy dressed in black cloaks or soft, silent dark garb with purple trim, piping, or accessories during rituals. High ceremonial dress for those of rank or taking a special role in a ritual was a long-sleeved robe of deep purple over a black velvet chemise or black trousers and a black shirt.

Adventuring Garb: Sharran clergy wore practical clothes in the fashion of the land they were in while pursuing day-to-day life. They were fond of jewelry fashioned from obsidian, black onyx, amethyst, and purple jade, but they were not required to wear it. When entering a situation where they might encounter hostilities, they wore armor and took appropriate protective measures.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:14:41 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #10 on: January 24, 2018, 06:03:26 am »

TARGUS
The Reaver, Master of All Weapons, Lord of War
Symbol: A five-armed tentacus (a pinwheel of five lack, snaky arms spinning counterclockwise, each arm ending in an identical sword)
Home Plane: Limbo/Battle  Garde
Alignment: Chaotic Neutral
Portfolio:War, skill-at-arms, duels, berserkers,  plunder
Worshippers:Targus attracted to his priesthood skilled fighters, especially those with a reckless streak or who enjoyed a one-on-one duel. He was the god whom warriors turned to when going in to battle; it was his whim that a general hoped had been properly appeased so that an engagement would go his way and not the way of his foe.
Favored Weapon:"The Tentacus", a pinwheel of five black snaky arms, each ending in a longsword. (Two- Bladed Sword)
Cleric Alignment:CN, CE, CG
NWN Domain: Destruction, Strength, Travel, War

History Relationships: Targus (TAR-guhs) was the god of war. He was associated more with the rampaging destruction and plundering of war than tactics, strategies, or armies. He was a fierce figure of random and lawless carnage, but his destruction was more mindless than of evil intent. The Reaver was linked with the mad bloodlust that overtook warriors, resulting in horrifying butchery. Targus was repulsed by the corruption and the lack of purity of purpose in Moander. He was totally in smitten with Shar, who he believed to be the most beautiful and gracious being to have ever existed. He would hear no word spoken against her, even when all logic dictated otherwise. While Selûne considered him an enemy because he sided with Shar in most matters, Targus considered Selûne too beautiful in spirit and self to hate, though Shar worked on him constantly to finally firmly  turn against her.

Dogma: : Targans believed that peace was for weak fools. War made all who fought strong, and only in head-to-head conflict was honor satisfied. Only cowards avoided battle. Diplomatic solutions were for fools, the soft, and the dishonorable; the only true answer was in battle. Any who struck down  a foe  from ambush or from behind were to be scorned as the cow- ards they were. Retreat was never an option, even in the face of a greater foe, for if a warrior’s heart was pure in intent and focused on Targus, he would provide the strength to conquer any foe. A warrior’s word was his bond, and no one could be trusted more than a shield companion. All honorable warriors were to be given respect, even if they were your enemy; how- ever, even honorable foes are still foes. Battlelust was a gift from Targus; with it the faithful found the focus and  the  strength to defeat any enemy and refuge from  the confusion  and pain of the battlefield.
The charge given to novices in the faith of Targus was “Bow down to me, and triumph in arms. Always go armed in readi- ness for the fray. Do battle at least once a tenday for the greater glory of Targus, but do so honorably, face-to-face. Spread fear of Targus, and the message of his power  that brings victory to his believers in every land you enter. At least once a year, challenge and slay a greater foe than yourself for Targus so that you test always the limits of your skill and press it to increase.”
Day-to-Day  Activities: Most Targan priests were warriors in  a militia, army, or guard force, or were raiders who supported  their villages, clans, or tribes by seizing booty from others in battle. Many of them led others into battle, and also were responsible for their training and the constant improvement of their unit’s tactics, The honor code of battle meant that Targan warriors were extremely loyal to their leaders, but not necessarily to the cause they were fighting for, and followed their orders even when they seemed suicidal. In exchange, Targan officers never  betrayed their units, trying to provide them with small luxuries whenever possible, fought with them to the end, and made heroic efforts to protect them in the midst of the fray.
Priests of Targus were charged to keep warfare a thing of honor. They stood in judgment of any warrior who was accused of breaking Targus’s roughly defined honor code of battle. Any who were deemed guilty of breaking that code met immediate and bloody justice; when circumstances were unclear, those who insisted upon their innocence were allowed to determine the verdict in battle to the death with their accuser.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Targus  demanded  to be worshipped in two ways: A believer who killed any foe in battle should shout out the power’s name over the body of his victim to dedicate the death to Targus as an offering. The sec- ond way to worship him was at a stone Blood Altar in one of his shrines or temples. Prayer to Targus at a Blood Altar began with drops of blood being spilled into troughs in the stone altar. Then the devout entreated the Reaver to hear, promised to per- form some act of battle valor involving personal combat and risk or skill-at-arms, however small, and then called on the Master of All Weapons for aid, strength, or guidance.
There were no calendar-related Targan religious rituals. Any gathering of seven or more priests could call a Blood Festival. A Blood Festival involved a feast wherein at least some of the food was butchered at or next to the table and subsequently devoured while still bloody (that is, not fully cooked). Initiations of priests to the Full Blood, the ceremony by which novices were made into full priests, were required to take place at a Blood Festival. Initiation into the Full Blood involved dip- ping the supplicants’ hands into fresh blood and then painting their cheeks with the symbol of Targus with blood. The blood used had to be that of one or more monsters (dangerous crea- tures) slain by the supplicants to be initiated and full priests of Targus with no other assistance.

Affiliated Orders: Most military units had some affiliation, though it could be loose, with the Targan church. A few especially dedicated priests and warriors of the Targan faith belonged to the Brothers of Blood, an order dedicated to crushing the foes of Targus. Its members tended to die young and violently, however, as making constant attacks upon adversaries tended to make anyone’s life short and bloody. In addition, an order of rangers who pursued martial excellence, known the Brothers of Steel and Honor, served some Targan military units and had pledged their allegiance to  Targus.

Priestly Vestments: Priests of Targus wore the best armor they could obtain, though it was usually extremely battle-worn. Many priests wore red boots and gloves, and they often had embroidery or ruby ornaments on their ceremonial robes in the shapes of teardrops of blood. High priests usually wore scarlet or crimson over-robes or tabards. Targan clergy members typi- cally had belt buckles or cloak pins fashioned in the shape of the tentacus of Targus or even bore daggerlike belt weapons sporting a hand-surrounding hilt in the shape of a whirlwind of five blades.

Adventuring Garb: Priests of Targus wore almost the same outfits in the field as they did to ceremonial functions, sporting armor, red boots and gloves, crimson capes, and decorative ornamentation in the shape of the tentacus. They carried a tentacus as their holy symbol.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:14:50 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #11 on: January 24, 2018, 06:04:23 am »

TYCHE
Lady Fate, Lady Doom, the Lady Who Smiles, Kismet
Symbol: A huge horn, inside of which she was keeping all wealth and richness of the realm
Home Plane: Olympus/Olympus
Alignment: True Neutral
Portfolio: Fortune, luck, fate, misfortune, accidents, accountability, adventurers, explorers, traders, trade
Worshippers: Tyche was an extremely popular goddess among adventurers, and her faith was on the rise as more and more people pursued that career. Lady Fate was beloved of those who lived or worked in danger, for she rewarded the faithful and others who lived in the manner she deemed proper—daring all and trusting to chance—with her favor: good luck. The Lady’s ways could seem fickle to the uninitiated or nonbelievers, for by her very nature the support she gave was uncertain in all particulars. “The joy of the doubt and the danger,” also known as the Lady’s Joy and the Lady’s Way, was that which was most dear to her true followers.
Favored Weapon:A Silver Disk (Shurikan)
Cleric Alignment: Any non-lawful
NWN Domain: Evil, Good, Protection, Travel, Trickery

History Relationships: Tyche (TIE-key) was the goddess of fate, luck, victory and fortune. Since she governed both the good and bad things that happened in life, she was praised as well as placated by her worships, many of whom were more afraid of her allowing them to have misfortunes befall them than intent upon coaxing her to bless them with luck. She was seen as a fickle power, easily distracted and restless in her pursuits.

Dogma:. The battle cry of the followers of Tyche was “Fortune favors the bold.” Those who had no direction or goals soon encountered ill luck, for those on no set course were at the capricious mercy of misfortune, which was no mercy at all. A brave heart and willingness to take risks beat out a carefully wrought plan nine times out of ten. One had to place oneself in the hands of fate (meaning in the hands of Tyche) and trust to one’s own luck, and priests of Tyche were supposed to be showing their good fortune— and acceptance of bad fortune—as a confidence in the Lady and in themselves. Lady Fate bid that each mortal chase his or her own unique goals—so long as they didn’t counter the express wishes of herself—and it was in this chase that the Lady aided her followers. Day-to-Day Activities: The clergy of the Lady went throughout Faerûn urging folk to take chances and pursue their dreams, instead of spending all their days planning and daring nothing. Having offered such counsel, Tychean clergy were duty bound to aid those who had dared with healing spells and other magical aid (sometimes surreptitiously) so as to reinforce the message of the good fortune one can win by trusting in Tyche. However, the clergy of Tyche were not above enjoying acting mysteriously to manipulate simpler folk into serving them in matters both great and small, from providing them with food, luxurious shelter, and companionship, to giving them weapons to wield against their rivals.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Whatever their differences throughout the years, the clergy of Tyche always adhered  to rituals of greeting, touching their silver disks (the holy symbols of Tyche) to each other after watchwords of recognition had been exchanged. To unknown persons and beings they knew to be worshipers of Tyche, they would say: “Life is short. Live it as Tyche means it to be lived!” This was answered by: “Dare all, and see victory through the Lady.” The watchwords between friends, or when both parties knew each other to be clergy of Tyche, were simpler: “Defy,” answered by “Dare much.”
Midsummer was the most important festival of Tyche—a wild, night-long revel of reckless, mischievous daring-do and romantic trysts. It was a time for wandering clergy to gather and meet with those of allied faiths and relatives. Many missions and plans were hatched at such times.

Affiliated Orders: The church sponsored some adventuring companies, and countless adventuring groups independently ded- icated themselves to the Lady after luck smiled on them during a sticky situation. The one knightly order affiliated with the church was the Honor Guard of Fate, a group of rangers who performed information-gathering missions for the church and served as bodyguards to high-level priests traveling in dangerous areas or engaged in dangerous missions for the church.
Honored members of the clergy were inducted into the Society of the Elders of Free Fate, which sponsored an assortment of exploration and trade expeditions and attempted to improve Netherese relations with members of the other sentient races of Faerûn. Relations between several small halfling communities and the Elders were cordial.
Priestly Vestments: Priests of Tyche wore stately robes of different shades of purple, blue-purple, mauve, and lilac, accent- ed and accessorized with silver. The precise cut of the standard clerical dress varied from temple to temple. Personal taste of the matriarch or patriarch of a temple influenced the dress code, as did climate (natural and political) and availability of fine clothing. The common item worn by all priests was the disk of Tyche, usually carried on a small chain.

Adventuring Garb: All adventuring or traveling priests wore whatever garments they chose, though the colors purple and silver were still predominant. High boots also seemed favorite fashion elements. All priests continued to wear Tyche’s silver disk next to their skin, usually as a medallion worn around the neck; however, many also wore smaller holy symbols as anklets, bracelets, or at their hips, under their clothing

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2018, 06:04:53 am »

CORELLON LARETHIAN
Coronal of Arvandor, Creator of the Elves, First of the Seldarine, Preserver of Life, The Protector, Ruler of All Elves
Symbol: Crescent Moon
Home Plane:Olympus/Arvandor
Alignment: Chaotic Good
Portfolio: Arts, crafts, elves (esp. sun elves), magic (elven magic, High Magic), music and bards, poetry and poets, war and warriors
Worshippers: He was the creator and preserver of the Tel'Quessir, governing those things held in the highest esteem among elves, such as magic, music, arts, crafts, poetry, and warfare.Elves, and half-elves (as well as many bards) worship Corellon. He favors those who kill orcs and the followers of Lolth. He blesses those who aid others. He is upset at those who defile the dead, or flee from their foes. 
Favored Weapon: Sahandrian (longsword)
Cleric Alignment: CG, CN, NG
NWN Domain: Good, Magic, Protection, War

History Relationships: The Creator of the Elves has forged stong alliances with the leaders of the other demihuman pantheons in face of the seemingly endless waves of human expansion. and the ever present threat of the monstrous populations and their dark powers, as well as the good- and neutral-aligned powers of the humans. The Protector works closely with Mystryl, the Mother of All Magic.  Whereas the Lady of Mysteries govers the Weave, Corellon oversees elven magic, particularly elven High Magic, and the intimate connection between the Fair Folk and the mantle of magic that envolopes the world. Corellon's epic battle with Gruumsh One-Eye, leader of the Orcs is legendary and they have never reached a lasting truce in their neverp-ending battle over territory.

Dogma: Corellon desires to protect and preserve the elven race, return to his people their lost artistic heritage, and to thwart the schemes of the drow and the orcs. This also means guarding against the corruption within that resulted in the creation of the drow. Corellon advises his faithful to guard against stagnation as well, continually seeking out new experiences. They seek to bring out beauty through art, craft, and magic. The elves are sculptors and wardens of magic's endless mysteries. Bring forth the beauty that envelops and lets the spirit gambol unfettered. Seek out new experiences and new ways. Ward against those that would destroy what they cannot create. Commune with the natural and mystical world. Be ever vigilant against the return of the banished darkness and be strong in heart against the corruption of the Spider Queen.

Day-to-Day Activities: Priests of Corellon are expected to serve actively in the defense and artistic development of elven communities and to work to mediate disputes that arise among the Fair Folk. Corellon's church emphasizes his protective and artisan aspects over his role as ruler of the elves. They watch over the borders of elven land, guard elven communities, help shape the appearance of elven settlements, and create beautiful items for use within the community and trade without. It is rare to find one of his clerics in a position of leadership, though many work behind the scenes to ensure a smooth functioning government.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Corellon's faithful celebrate a great number of holy days, most of which are tied to astronomical events and occur only once every few years or decades.

Affiliated Orders:  Corellon is the divine patron of many knightly orders. Outside of elven homelands the most frequently encounter is The Fellowship of the Forgotten Flower, a loosely structured organization made of elven knights or elven warriors dedicated to the recovery of lost elven relics from long-abandoned realms.

Priestly Vestments: Ceremonial vestments for priest of Corellon consist of azure robes moode of gossamer and embroidered with silver quarter moons. Silver circlets engraved with the Prootector's symbol are worn on the brow

Adventuring Garb: Corellon priests generally favor skyblue cloaks, elven chain mail, lonswords, and longbows in imitation of thier divine patron.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:15:22 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #13 on: January 24, 2018, 06:06:44 am »

GARL GLITTERGOLD
The Joker, The Priceless Gem, The Sparkling Wit, The Watchful Protector
Symbol: Golden Nugget
Home Plane: Dothion/the Golden Hills (Glitterhome)
Alignment: Lawful Good
Portfolio: Humor, Gemcutting, Gnomes, Finesmithing and Lapidary, Protection, Trickery
Worshippers: Garl was the most popular of the gnomish deities, and honored, in one way or another, by nearly all gnomes. Adventurers, Bards, Defending soldiers, Gemcutters, Gnomes, Illusionists, Jewelers, Miners, Rogues, Smiths
Favored Weapon: Arumdina (Battleaxe)
Cleric Alignment:LG, NG, LN
NWN Domain: Earth, Good, Trickery, Protection

History Relationships:

Dogma: While life may sometimes be hard, it is important to keep a sense of humor and always welcome opportunities for laughter and delight. Communities are forged through the cooperation and communal spirit of a group of individuals who work and play together. The strength of a community is the cooperation that binds individuals into more than the sum of their contributions. A great prank can help to lighten hard times and make good ones shine. Those who are in authority should never take themselves too seriously, or they lose touch with those they direct and care for. Teach and preserve the tales and traditions of the Forgotten Folk, so that they are never forgotten among their own kind. Do not fear change or the unorthodox, for therein lies the future. Finally, in all things, do what works."

Day-to-Day Activities: Elder gmones, alive in what is called the Silver Age remember the time of the Enslavement. Treated as little more then slaves by their would Netherese masters, the faithful struggled to keep their communites together and safe. It was the priests of The Watchful Protecter that galvinized the gnomes and gave them the strength to revolt and endure the repeated, brutal suppressions. It is unclear when exactly and who the idea to simple refuse to word came from but reverance for Garl Glittergold and the respect given to his followers is unusually strong and vocal. Modern priests have began to serve their communities as crafterseducators, eddntertainers, mediators, and protectors. Even those who wander in search of adventure serve this function, for their exploits are incorporated into the oral traditions. The priesthood maintains a careful vigilance to protect against hostile races with a special cautionary tale about their time in the "service" to the Netherese.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: The most important day, known to Gnomes simply as "Off" has been celebrated each year since 1472 in honor of the end of being enslaved. It is a combination of remeberance of the dead and celebrations with periods of silent prayer, dancing, sharing of communal meals, joke, storey telling and ends with a retelling of the "Off"
Ceremonies in honor of Garl are flashy, full of illusion and mystery. They extol gnomish virtues such as cleverness and craftsmanship. During the Communion of Laughter, the faithful are expected to sacrifice a bit of gold or gold dust to the church, who use it for the good of the community. Prayers to Garl are typically composed in call-and-response style, with the priest asking a riddle and the flock calling out the answer. Worship services are held on the 13th of each month in a holiday known as the Communion of Laughter. Lasting the whole day, the Communion of Laughter includes quiet contemplation, prayer, communal eating, dancing, storytelling, and joke-telling contests.

Affiliated Orders: The Companions of Arumdina are a military order dedicated to the defence of gnome communities and are skilled in defensive military tactics, particularly in the rolling hill and deep forests most gnomish communities may be found. The Glittering Jesters travel from community to community telling tales at the expense of the pretentious and high-browed though still careful in their veiled mockery of the Netherese.  Some of this order strive to carry out daring tasks and hope that others judge it worthy of being attributed to Garl himself.

Priestly Vestments: A gold plated warhelm, a golden belt, and if possible a golden suit of chain or platemail with a gold nugget for a holy symbol

Adventuring Garb: Garl's clergy employ a variety of weapon and typically favor the heaviest armor available, unless stealth and mobility is needed.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:15:47 pm by Professor Misclick »

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Re: Deities of Netheril: Age of Magic
« Reply #14 on: January 24, 2018, 06:08:02 am »

GRUUMSH
One-Eye, He Who Never Sleeps, the One-Eyed God, He Who Watches
Symbol: An unblinking eye
Home Plane:
Alignment: Chaotic Evil
Portfolio: Orcs, conquest, strength, survival, territory
Worshippers: Gruumsh was the unblinking god of destruction and conquest who unleashed the savage multitudes against outposts of civilization. He was worshiped by orcs and half-orcs and came to dominate some of the other savage humanoids as well, driving his savage multitudes to expand their power by whatever brutal means they wished. His shamans advised chiefs and warmongers to raid, kill, and conquer.
Favored Weapon: The Bloodspear (Longspear/Shortspear), Double-Axe
Cleric Alignment:CE, NE, CN
NWN Domain: Destruction, Evil, Strength, War

History Relationships: In the beginning all the gods met and drew lots for the parts of the world in which their representative races would dwell. The human gods drew the lot that allowed humans to dwell where they pleased, in any environment. The elven gods drew the green forests, the dwarven deities drew the high mountains, the gnomish gods the rocky, sunlit hills, and the halfling gods picked the lot that gave them the fields and meadows. Then the assembled gods turned to the orcish gods and laughed loud and long. "All the lots are taken!" they said tauntingly. "Where will your people dwell, One-Eye? There is no place left!"

There was silence upon the world then, as Gruumsh One-Eye lifted his great iron spear and stretched it over the world. The shaft blotted the sun over a great part of the lands as he spoke: "No! You Lie! You have rigged the drawing of the lots, hoping to cheat me and my followers. But One-Eye never sleeps. One-Eye sees all. There is a place for orcs to dwell…here!," he bellowed, and his spear pierced the mountains, opening a mighty rift and chasms. "And here!," and the spearhead split the hills and made them shake and covered them in dust. "And here!," and the black spear gouged the meadows and made them bare.

"There!" roared He-Who-Watches triumphantly, and his voice carried to the ends of the world. "There is where the orcs shall dwell! There they will survive, and multiply, and grow stronger, and a day will come when they cover the world, and they will slay all of your collective peoples! Orcs shall inherit the world you sought to cheat me of!"

In a past time, Gruumsh had two eyes but he lost one in a fight with the chief elven god Corellon Larethian. Gruumsh meant to paralyze Corellon with his magical spear; this attack failed and initiated an epic battle. During the course of this battle, Gruumsh injured Corellon and, according to legend, from the blood shed the elven people were created. Corellon ended the fight by putting out Gruumsh's left eye, which is how Gruumsh earned his moniker "One-Eye". Some orcish clerics denied this tale, dismissing it as elven propaganda while claiming that Gruumsh always had one eye

Dogma: Seek unceasing war against your enemies, and kill or enslave those who oppose you. Acquire territory and living space. Destroy elves, their homes, and their lands. Crush the dwarves and take their deep caves for your own. Be strong, and be prepared to show your strength at any moment. Showing weakness is the key to an early death. Those that are too weak to fight for your tribe should be put to the spear. The greatest gift that He Who Watches gave to the orcs was the ability to survive where the weaker races would die. Build your strength in these lands and use them to overrun your enemies.

Day-to-Day Activities: The faithful of Gruumsh are a raucous and violent lot. Seeking to ensure only the strongest survive, they drive tribal chiefs to raid, conquer and kill. Divided into four major tribes, and countless smaller ones, the orcs are a constant threat. They fight among themselves as much as any other foe with shamans having varied influence in the tribes, alway more then the chiefs would wish. Few chiefs have ever been successful at holding power without the backing of a shaman, something the Gruuman are well aware.
The dream of every Gruuman is a massive horde sweeping all those before them away in a bloody frenzy though special hatred is reserved for Corellan and His children.

Holy Days/Important Ceremonies: Orcs view might makes right and each night is filled with brawls and bloody contests for prestige and position. While not overtly religious, orcs know the benefit of having a shaman's favor so put up with whatever spur of the moment ritual or blessing is to be had in preparation for a raid or bloody battle.

Priestly Vestments: Placing little value on ceremony, like most orcs, open display of foes defeated and spoils claimed are worn as a show of power. The great unblinking eye is often crafted from the remains of some powerful creature the shaman killed to earn the blessing of Grummsh in a secret ritual. Orc war priests wear a patch over one eye to symbolize their worship of the orc deity.They also dress in dark red vestments, armored with war helms and black plate mail. The strongest or most reckless shirk armor, a challenge and warning to any would be usurpers.

Adventuring Garb: See above, though prone to wear whatever is the most terrifying and brutal looking equipement available.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2018, 10:15:54 pm by Professor Misclick »